Becoming Mentally Strong

A preview of the  MHS girls track team

Story by: Jess Facer and Mykala Wright                                                                                                                                                                             

When most people think of spring track season, they think of the long hours athletes spend training and pushing their bodies to their physical limits; working to be able to cross their finish line first. But what about the psychological effects of running?

Whether you are a thrower, high jumper, long distance runner or sprinter, mental toughness is key in accomplishing your pre-planned victories and goals. Madison High School’s girls track team knows all about becoming mentally strong.

Everyday for almost three months the girls train both mentally and physically, dealing with sore muscles, poor weather conditions, and nine hour track meets. With all that to deal with, one would have to have mental endurance. So what makes these girls and their sport so special? The answer is being mentally tough.

Kylie Moldenhauer is a long distance runner for Madison High School. Being a distance runner requires a lot of strength in the mental aspect of the sport. “Mental toughness is being positive in yourself,” said Moldenhauer. “It’s all in your head, and you decide if you can do it or not.”

Moldenhauer admits that she always has a goal before her race, which helps her to stay strong mentally during a race when she is tired.

Obviously, those that run on the track team have had many experiences with mental will power. But what about those athletes who participate in non-running events?

Although there are many great runners on the track team, this is only one small part of a sport that encompasses many different events.

Athletes such as Haley Parker participate in throwing events meant to test an athlete’s strength. Pole vaulters, high jumpers, triple and long jumpers, are also a part of events other than running. Although these events might seem a little different, their athletes have one thing in common besides being on the same team. Their mental stamina is just as strong.

“I do better under pressure and can function better,” said Parker. She also explained that she has to be tough when she works out and she doesn’t get intimidated by other competitors easily.

Track and field is an important sport to those girls that participate. It not only teaches them how to be physically fit, but also how to become mentally stronger and push their minds and bodies to their limits. Many examples of this come from returning state competitors of the Madison team.  

Some of those returning state competitors include Rachel Morrin who will be back running the 3200 and 1600 meter; Emma Cromar who will be running the 300 meter hurdles; Remi Mcwhorter will be doing 100 meter hurdles, high jump, and triple jump; Kylie Moldenhauer will be running 800 and 1600; and Hannah Moore will be performing the 200 and long jump.

Some of those returning state competitors include sophomores Rachel Morrin, Kylie Moldenhauer, juniors Emma Cromar and Hannah Moore, and senior Remi Mcwhorter. Both Morrin and Moldenhauer will be returning for the long distance 3200 and 1600 events. Cromar

will be training to hopefully compete once again in the 300 hurdles. Moore will also return from her last year participation in the high jump and 200 meter events. Mcwhorter will be the returning senior state competitor for the high jump, 100 meter hurdles, and triple jump.

The Bobcats girls team is a strong team both mentally and physically, and that will definitely take them far in the next few months of their season.

 

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